Fusarium head blight: epidemiological origin of the effects of cultural practices on head blight attacks and the production of mycotoxins by Fusarium in wheat grains

Abstract : Fusarium head blight is an ancient disease and is very common throughout the world. In this article, we review current knowledge concerning the effects of cultural practices on the development of head blight and the production of toxins in the field. The qualitative effects of these practices on the severity of the disease and/or the production of toxins are in the process of being elucidated but, in many cases, detailed studies have not yet been carried out or conflicting results have been obtained. However, it should be noted that these effects have not yet been quantified. Three different cultural practices are today considered to be of prime importance for combating this disease and the production of mycotoxins: deep tillage, the choice of the preceding crop in the rotation and the choice of appropriate cultivar, as varietal effects exist.
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Agnès Champeil, Thierry Doré, Jean-Francois Fourbet. Fusarium head blight: epidemiological origin of the effects of cultural practices on head blight attacks and the production of mycotoxins by Fusarium in wheat grains. Plant Science, Elsevier, 2004, 166 (6), pp.1389-1415. ⟨10.1016/j.plantsci.2004.02.004⟩. ⟨hal-01362219⟩

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